News and Views

History UK-sponsored panel at Heritage Dot conference, Lincoln, 3-4 June 2019

History UK is sponsoring a panel at the inaugural Heritage Dot conference, to be held at Lincoln on 3-4 June 2019.  The conference is hosted by the University of Lincoln, Imperial War Museums and the Heritage Lottery Fund. There is further information at the conference website, but here’s a brief extract:

Heritage Dot explores the exciting collision between the worlds of digital tools and technology and cultural heritage. This fusion is creating new relationships between past and future, tradition and innovation. It is enabling new audiences to reinterpret the past and technologies of the future to reimagine professional practice. At the same time, its continually evolving nature can be a confusing space, placing demands on people and organisations within a landscape of diminishing access to resources.

History UK will sponsor one panel (this includes paying fees, transport and accommodation for those taking part). So, if you’re a historian from a subscribing department who works on digital heritage and are interested in presenting at the conference (or have already decided to do so!), please do get in touch with us by emailing either or both of the co-conveners.

The call for papers is available here: http://heritagedot.org/call-for-participation/

Image taken from page 237 of 'The Half Hour Library of Travel, Nature and Science for young readers'

Meet The Funders!

History UK is joining forces with the National Archives’ Higher Education Archive Programme and the Independent Research Organisation Consortium to host a “Meet the Funders” event at The National Archives in Kew on Monday 5thNovember.  The event will run from 10.00 til 16.30 and will enable archivists, academics and researchers to hear about relevant funding opportunities from key funding bodies and from those who have received awards from academic funders.  There will be plenty of opportunities to network and to work on how to scope and pitch your project to increase your chances of success.  The event is free and lunch and refreshments will be provided.  Book your place now by clicking https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/meet-the-funders-higher-education-archive-programme-network-meeting-tickets-50211490921 and please feel free to share this link with colleagues who you feel may be interested.

Update: Guide to Collaboration

Image of launch eventHere are some quick updates on the Guide to Collaboration between the Archive and Higher Education Sectors (2018 update). The TNA’s Higher Education Archives Programme (HEAP) has published a short introduction to the guidance (accessible here) for those who want to publicise the guidance at their own institutions.

There’s also been a nice post from Katie Flanagan (a.k.a. Katie the Librarian) on our workshop to launch the guidance back in June (here), of which Caroline Sampson has provided some excellent images. As you can see, it was a very active event!

Groupwork  at launch event

 

Published: Guide to Collaboration between the Archive and Higher Education Sectors

Over the past year, History UK has worked together wit the The National Archives and the Higher Education Archive Programme (HEAP) to update the Guide to Collaboration between the Archive and Higher Education Sectors, which was published last week. The guide is supported by innovative case studies from across the archives and higher education sectors. It gives insights into the drivers, initiatives, support and language of both sectors and offers advice on identifying organisational and project priorities. It also explains how to understand outputs and outcomes in mutually beneficial projects and offers advice for measuring impact in cross-sector collaborations.

Thanks to everyone who contributed to putting together this guide. We hope that it is the start of an ongoing collaboration with TNA!

 

Another post on our Academic Job Boot Camp

Amy King, a PhD candidate in the Department of Italian at the University of Bristol/Bath, supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Council and currently working on oral history project @bristoldockers, has written a short post about her (positive!) experience at this year’s boot camp:

Amy King presenting on her research“I was fortunate enough to attend the Academic Job Boot Camp five days before an interview for a university post. Having sent in my CV and cover letter, made my slides for the presentation, and planned for the mock interview, I felt as prepared as I could be for the training day. It’s not often that training allows for one-to-one sessions and advice for each and every attendee, but the Boot Camp gave us just that. No matter how much interview preparation you do at home, nothing beats having the feedback of experienced interviewers on your delivery, the way you sell yourself (and if your CV/cover letter is matching up!) and your approach to answering questions. The presentation session was equally as useful, and a reminder of how important it is to clearly communicate a subject that is all too familiar to us, but perhaps new to our audience. It was also a great opportunity to recognise (and adopt) some of the impressive presentation tricks used by peers! Thank you to all involved for their generosity in the time they gave each of us for personal feedback. I’m absolutely sure this training helped me to get the job!”

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